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How Do I Tell My Family I Need Substance Abuse Help?

It is common for the family members of an addicted individual to insist that the person gets help, but sometimes, a person may have been abusing substances without the knowledge of their loved ones. If you have found yourself in this situation and suddenly realize that you are in need of intensive addiction treatment, it can be extremely beneficial to talk to your loved ones about this need and about how they can help you find the treatment you require. But how can you begin to broach the subject?

Write It Down

Before you decide to talk to your family members, write down your thoughts and feelings, even turn it into a script where you write exactly what you would like to tell them. Sometimes, in discussing issues that cause us to feel embarrassed, frustrated, or uncomfortable, we say things we don’t mean or forget to tell others something important. Writing your feelings down will truly help you collect your thoughts and have a better idea of what you want to say.

Be Prepared for Emotions

Need Substance Abuse Help

Although your family may be upset to learn of your addiction, they will likely want to help you in any way they can.

If you have not yet discussed your substance abuse with your loved ones, there is a strong possibility they may become emotional. It is important to try and stay calm and to ask them to do the same. If you feel the situation is becoming volatile, it is perfectly acceptable to excuse yourself.

For this reason, many individuals hire a professional interventionist or counselor in order to help them speak to their loved one who has been abusing substances, and you may want to do the same. But if you are unable to do so in your current situation, try to stay calm and remind your loved ones that you are reaching out to them for help.

Be Honest

It is likely that you have not been honest with your family as of late if they know nothing about your substance abuse. If they ask you certain questions about how much you were using, where you got the money, or other inquiries, it is important to try and be honest. Also, if you feel that you cannot answer a certain question, it is much better to tell them, “I prefer not to say” than to lie.

Ask for Help

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, “Family and friends can play critical roles in motivating individuals with drug problems to enter and stay in treatment.” If you are at the point of asking your family for help, then you probably already know you need to attend a professional treatment program. When you talk to them, suggest ways in which they can help you like with finding a treatment center, visiting you in inpatient care, or showing in other ways that they support you.

Your loved ones may be shocked or hurt at first, but it is likely that their desire for you to be safe and healthy will allow them to help you find the right treatments for your needs and begin a recovery with the kind of strong social support you require. If you would like to find a treatment center in your area or learn more about the consequences of substance abuse, call 1-800-895-1695.

Living with a Loved One Suffering from a Substance Abuse Disorder

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